Fall Festival for Children Saturday at Potomac Crescent Waldorf School

This guest post is by Elaine of the super blog Connor and Helen. She has the 411 on a great family event this weekend and has also provided some background on Waldorf education.

This Saturday October 16 is the Potomac Crescent Waldorf School’s Fall Festival, a fun family event from 10am-2pm at the school, located at 923 S 23rd Street, Arlington, VA 22202. The event takes place rain or shine. Cost per child is $10 (adults and children not participating in games and crafts are free).

The festival is specifically geared towards younger children (pre-K through grade 3). My husband and I have constructed a marble run – an in-progress photo begins this post- and there will be lots of other games emphasizing nature (pictured here).

Your children can also participate in several crafts, ranging from making a felt necklace to dyeing a handkerchief with natural dye. And regardless of whether the method suits you, I think you’ll probably have a great time at the festival. In some ways, it’s a step back in time. Lunch is available for an extra fee, as are two puppet plays. You might even score a bargain at the silent auction!

What is completely free however is a taste of Waldorf education. Early childhood education theories abound: Waldorf, Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and more. As a resident of the DC metro area, I have access to all of these, plus many parochial schools and public schools. I chose Waldorf for my children, based largely on the recommendation of a friend whose son attended Washington Waldorf School, at the time.

Because I’m an Arlington resident, I opted for the shorter commute to Potomac Crescent Waldorf School, but I am completely envious of the playground at a third Waldorf school in Silver Spring, Acorn Hill. Seriously, if you ever have the chance to attend their annual Spring Fair – do it. The place is incredible. [This event often occurs in April or May and I usually post the info here!  Here’s a past post by Tech Savvy Mama. – Jessica]

No one really knows what the “best” method is, of course, and the best method may be different for different children. Waldorf fits with my family. I love the emphasis on creative play, that opportunities for cooperative play are plentiful, and the fact that my children spend a good deal of time outside every day.

A typical Waldorf progression is a parent-child class that meets 1 morning a week — after the child turns 2.5, followed the next year by a 3-day class that meets 3 consecutive mornings (rather than a constantly interrupted rhythm of in-school on Monday, out on Tuesday, back on Wednesday, etc.), and finally 2 years of 5-day Kindergarten that meets only in the mornings. The thought of all-day Kindergarten almost made me cry.

Some of the other unique things about a Waldorf classroom are the absence of computers (or any electronics), the toys are made exclusively of natural materials (no plastic!), and until first grade, children do not write with a pencil. They do color with crayons and paint. Rather than hearing a story out of book, children are treated to a puppet play each day, which is perhaps why my son loves theatre so much. At age 2, he easily sat through a friend’s version of the Jungle Book when it was performed at Imagination Stage.

Many thanks to Jessica for letting me use her incredible platform to tell you about this event!

Comments

  1. LeticiaTechSavvyMama says

    Thanks for the linky love!  Still a huge fan of the Acorn Hill Spring Fair!

  2. Hi..
    Waldorf fits with my family. I love the emphasis on creative play, that opportunities for cooperative play are plentiful, and the fact that my children spend a good deal of time outside every day.
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